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Ryan Fitzgibbon


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Ryan Fitzgibbon


Work by Ryan Fitzgibbon:

Ryan Fitzgibbon is the founder and creative director of Hello Mr. 'a magazine about men who date men"

Ryan Fitzgibbon nominated graphic designer Zhang Qingyun:

I studied graphic design in college. I know how to use the basic tools and I have an eye for compositions and visual hierarchy. Naturally, as I’ve developed Hello Mr., my skills as a designer have dwindled. My brain still functions as a creative, but my ability to produce visual concepts requires more effort and external motivation than before. I’m lucky that I have so many creative people around me who drive and inspire me through these uncharted territories in my career.

Zhang Qingyun is one of those people. A brilliant designer, in the traditional sense of “design,” but it’s obvious that he’s not satisfied being known for anything traditional. He’s the hardest critic of his work, be it a poster, an identity rebrand, or the new collection of his clothing label. He’s dedicated and it shows. He inspires me in what he’s built so far, but it's clear that he’s just getting started. 

Work by Zhang Qingyun:

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Zhang Qingyun


Zhang Qingyun


Zhang Qingyun nominated Art Director/Dancer/Healer Ely Kim:

His work is earnest and irreverent at once – posters that proclaim “Rich People Deserve Fun Too”, “There Is No Such Thing as Fake Jewelry”, or a video tutorial named “Ely Kim Presents: How to Lead A Phenomenal Life!”. It’s an understatement to say Ely doesn’t take graphic design too seriously – he actually makes you question why anyone would. 

That doesn’t mean his work is compromised in anyway. Once I helped him putting together a costume for his own birthday party promotion video (there is indeed a very blurry line between his work and him as a person). We spent hours rummaging through this huge fabric shop, to find the perfect materials that would reflect the lights the way he envisioned. The result is impressive. If I can pick one word to describe Ely I would go for glamor – the real type of glamor that’s honest and arresting at once.

Work by Ely Kim:




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Ely Kim


Ely Kim


Ely Kim nominated Barcelona based art director BOLDTRON:

The work of BOLDTRON reaches for realms unknown. It is funny, emotional, cerebral and intergalactic at the same time. Working in themes of the internet, new age, the metaphysical, and the visuals of our everyday, it is both ironic and sincere at the same time. A celebration of our search for meaning in a meaningless world. A celebration of our collective pop culture consciousness. It inspires me to dream of cyber futures and endless crystal landscapes. Visually arresting and always making me smile. I think the only way to describe it is sublime. 

Work by BOLDTRON:

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Boldtron


Boldtron


BOLDTRON nominated artist Ted Mineo

Firstly I was really into his paintings or cosmic portals, pizzas glittery. So accurate and really illustrative. I've been following his work for ages and suddenly he's been showing a perfect blend of images , maybe photography based or digital illustration process works. I still can't figure out how these organic forms are made but they look stunning and really intriguing.  Check here.

Ted Mineo and his work:

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Ted Mineo


Ted Mineo


Ted Mineo nominated Hole, an on-going project between Colleen Asper and Marika Kandelaki

Working together under the name Hole, Colleen Asper and Marika Kandelaki practice a Promethean feminism that twists and divides. Their visions are sharp and strange, populated by sprits and subjects in extremis.  The performances, texts and objects they produce reach beyond the material boundaries of particular stages and pages in order to “take the language we have been given and speak it against itself and to each other”.  

“The language we have been given”, by their reckoning, is a system to be abstracted into its most generic elements and given physical form. That process of abstraction and creation is the essence of what they do; it’s a kind of performative philosophy that forces ideas and bodies onto the same level.  This way of working teems with both violence and possibility.  Violence, because ideas are susceptible to gravity and permeability once they are given physical form.  They may be torn or destroyed.  Possibility, because an embodied idea can be worn, built and manipulated.  

Visions of the future should not remain visions - they must be built here, now. That’s what Hole’s work tells me. That urgency is what makes it so necessary. 

Work by Hole:

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